Featured Papers

Nanoparticles get a magnetic handle

Nanoparticles get a magnetic handle

New method produces particles that can glow with color-coded light and be manipulated with magnets. A long-sought goal of creating particles that can emit a colorful fluorescent glow in a biological environment, and that could be precisely manipulated into position within living cells, has been achieved by a team of researchers at MIT and several […]

Read More →

Read More →

Fine-tuning emissions from quantum dots

Fine-tuning emissions from quantum dots

New MIT analysis should enable development of improved color displays and biomedical monitoring systems. Tiny particles of matter called quantum dots, which emit light with exceptionally pure and bright colors, have found a prominent role as biological markers. In addition, they are realizing their potential in computer and television screens, and have promise in solid-state […]

Read More →

Read More →

Two from MIT honored at World Technology Awards

Two from MIT honored at World Technology Awards

PhD candidate Maher Damak and Professor Moungi Bawendi recognized for advances in engineering and chemistry. Leonardo DiCaprio began 2016 by capturing his long-awaited Academy Award for Best Actor, but his year ended in defeat, thanks to MIT graduate student Maher Damak. Damak, a PhD candidate in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and a fellow in […]

Read More →

Read More →

A new contrast agent for MRI

A new contrast agent for MRI

New iron oxide nanoparticles could help avoid a rare side effect caused by current contrast agents. A new, specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle developed by a team at MIT and elsewhere could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures. In rare cases, the currently used gadolinium agents […]

Read More →

Read More →

A new eye on the middle ear

A new eye on the middle ear

Shortwave infrared instrument from MIT could see deeper, help improve diagnosis of ear infections. A new device developed by researchers at MIT and a physician at Connecticut Children’s Medical Center could greatly improve doctors’ ability to accurately diagnose ear infections. That could drastically reduce the estimated 2 million cases per year in the United States […]

Read More →

Read More →

Size Homeostasis in Adherent Cells

Size Homeostasis in Adherent Cells

Size is an important phenotypic characteristic of any cell with consequences for tissue and organ architecture. In proliferating cells, size is the result of cell growth and cell division, which roughly halves the cell size each generation. Cells proliferating in unchanged conditions maintain a particular size distribution, suggesting that these two processes are coordinated [1]. […]

Read More →

Read More →

Multimodal Spectroscopic Tissue Scanner for Diagnosis of ex vivo Surgical Specimens

Multimodal Spectroscopic Tissue Scanner for Diagnosis of ex vivo Surgical Specimens

Fast and reliable intraoperative tissue diagnosis is a critical component of successful cancer surgery in a variety of organ systems. Yet there continues to exist a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment of excised surgical specimens. Currently, intraoperative margin assessment is done by visual inspection and palpation, followed by selective assessment […]

Read More →

Read More →

Long-term Glycemic Markers

Long-term Glycemic Markers

Diabetes mellitus, which is characterized by the defective regulation of blood glucose, is the most common disorder of the endocrine system, affecting 25.8 million people in the United States alone (2010). Given the lack of suitable therapeutic options, effective glycemic control is imperative in avoiding acute and chronic complications such as diabetic coma, and microvascular […]

Read More →

Read More →

Biomechanics and Biochemistry of Erythrocytes infected by Malaria Parasites

Biomechanics and Biochemistry of Erythrocytes infected by Malaria Parasites

During the intraerythrocytic development, the malaria parasite causes structural, biochemical, and mechanical changes to host red blood cells (RBCs). Major structural changes include the formation of parasitophorus vacuoles that surround the growing parasite in their host RBCs, loss of cell volume, and the appearance of small, nanoscale protrusions or ‘‘knobs,’’ on the membrane surface (1). From the biochemical standpoint, […]

Read More →

Read More →

Biomechanics of Erythrocytes in Sickle Cell Anemia

Biomechanics of Erythrocytes in Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD), also known as sickle cell anemia, is a genetic blood disorder resulted from a single point mutation in the βJglobin gene. The mutation in sickle hemoglobin (HbS) causes binding between the β1 and β2 chains of two HbS molecules when deoxygenated, and this crystallization produces a polymer nucleus, which grows inside […]

Read More →

Read More →

Top